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Markieff, Marcus Morris Need to Face Their New NBA Reality

Mark J. Rebilas/USA TODAY Sports

The Morris twins stand tall on the basketball court, but both Marcus and Markieff Morris are looking like infants when it comes to their actions off of it.

And in light of Markieff’s “trade demand” to remove himself from the Phoenix Suns organization, it’s time for both to grow up.

After the Suns traded Marcus — somewhat of a surprise considering the brothers collected a combined $52 million in extension earnings from the Suns last season — he wasted no time at taking shots at his former organization (via AP):

“Everybody knew how bad I wanted to play with my brother,” Morris said. “Phoenix knew. For them to trade me without consent or telling or anything like that was kind of like a, I would say slap in the face, because of the contract I took from those guys and the money I took from them. That was kind of a slap in the face.”

Because the organization owed him something? Because the team moved him into a situation that would be better for his personal growth? Spare me the Swan Song performed on the world’s smallest violin.

Morris, to his credit, later recognized that exact point on his personal growth when introduced at his Detroit Pistons press conference, but that was only when forced to accept the reality of a situation he didn’t want to be a part of in the first place.

While Marcus has worked on his maturation process — a clearly evolving process — Markieff has seemingly lagged behind.

Once news Marcus was traded to the Pistons came out, brother Markieff waited little time in weighing in on Twitter. Questions about his own future with the organization came to the forefront without clear or obvious answers. Now, just months after Suns general manager Ryan McDonough called Markieff one of the team’s two most talented players, Morris is calling for a swift and emphatic departure from the desert.

“One thing for sure, I am not going to be there,” Morris said.

“If you want to put that out there, you can put that out. ” he added. “I don’t give a [freak]. I am not going to be there at all. That’s just what it is.”

Morris is attempting to come off like a boss, but instead comes off like a joke, a clown and with clear entitlement that hasn’t been earned. With a ton to prove at the NBA level and nowhere close to reaching the level of superstar, Morris is going down a road he would’ve been better off avoiding altogether.

Instead of creating a reputation as a budding basketball player for a rapidly improving Phoenix Suns team, Morris has found himself in the headlines for all of the wrong reasons this offseason.

What team is going to take a chance on Morris now? Don’t expect the Pistons to come rescuing him and pair him with his brother. That’s not happening. Wherever Morris lands, he’s going to be without his brother. And if you think NBA teams don’t notice this type of behavior out of a player after he’s been paid, you’d be woefully wrong in overlooking a critical detail of how business is done.

Maybe Morris should ask J.R. Smith about reputation and if it has an impact. Smith, after being a LeBron James teammate and playing all the way through the NBA Finals, is still looking for a team in free agency as we approach the middle of August.

The Morris Twins — both of them — must realize that there’s no plausible path for the duo to spend their entire pro careers together. Once both accept and embrace that as the best (read: only) way to truly grow as both men and basketball players, that’s when each will begin to be viewed in a different light. Fair? Probably not, but it’s the reality of a business where evaluation is at the center of everything. Marcus, based on his comments in Detroit, has started that process. When will Markieff do the same?

There’s an expectation of men to be be grown by the time 25 rolls around. The Morris brothers will be 26 in September.

In a league where your ability to work with — and for — others is just as important as your skill set unless you’re a transcendent superstar, the bottom line is that the Morris boys must mature into men.

No more whining. No more complaining. Just production.

The Morris Twins have no one but themselves to blame for being in this position.

It’s time to be a professional.

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